Archive for the 'Urban Design' Category

PARK(ing) Day, 2013

January 18, 2014

Yes, I realize the timing is a bit…late, but I thought I’d document just the same. In 2012 our PARK(ing) Day was in SouthEnd, adjacent to a popular Friday Food Truck rally. This year we aimed for NoDa, a neighborhood known for it’s artsy nature. We set up shop using local resources, of course! A tire place around the corner on 36th graciously let us borrow the tires for a few hours and the train tracks were a host of marvelous branches we painted and used for street trees. And, yes, you might ask, a few of those painted trees do live on as a decoration to a neighboring apartment door.

We set up a temporary tattoo parlor…yes, temporary tattoos, and temporarily set up. It was a huge hit, and a great way to break down the invisible barriers between strangers. This is my favorite part of the event – talking to those just walking by, often with confused expressions – which, of course, gives me a perfect segway into a conversation, explaining the oddities that are occurring where cars normally do. I liked the phrase that came up, “Park your butt, not your Buick.” We chose this street because there is a void of sitting space, especially as the narrow sidewalks crowd with concert-goers and the like. One 20 foot parking space can go a long way for creating new conversations, hearing stories, and enjoying the street life.

We had a “wishing tree” where people could hang their neighborhood wishes. Not Just Coffee and Smelly Cat were kind enough to donate/let us borrow some coffee bean bags. We had games, tattoos, and just a place to sit while you waited for your cab.

Before

Before

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Also a good space for picnics…

IMG_6895 IMG_6891 IMG_6864 IMG_6901 IMG_6892 IMG_6913 IMG_6875 IMG_6905 IMG_6882 IMG_6874

And just when we packed up the last of the materials. Filled again. And how dead the space seems once more.

And just when we packed up the last of the materials. Filled again. And how dead the space seems once more.

Job searching and future opportunities

March 1, 2013

I graduate in May. You’ve probably met me, and I have probably directed you to this website.  I am going to be shameless put my portfolio and resume here, in hopes it will be an easy way to get to know me and to see my work.

Click to view my 2013 short portfolio. Here is the link to view a quick view of my thesis portfolio.

Here is my resume in the pdf version: KeihlyMoore_Resume2013_web

Clickable version that gets bigger:

KeihlyMoore_Resume2013_web

street section builder…

February 21, 2013

street section builder

 

This just in for all you urban designer / street geeks!

What could be more fun that playing around with how to design a street? 🙂

http://streetmix.net/

 

Common Ground and my architectural philosophy

October 15, 2012

Today, after a class discussion with David Leatherbarrow, I think I am closer to finding another piece of my personal philosophy on architecture.

Here I will try to articulate what I’ve learned. Know that I’m still in processing mode and thoughts will change, add, and grow on these issues. Many of these statements are quotes from David.

ARCHITECTURE NEEDS TO BE MORE GENEROUS. There I said it. It takes courage to give the heart of the ground floor, the heart of the building, over to the  public. (Leatherbarrow)

In Architecture we want to articulate our individuality, rather than what we share. Is there any common ground? Leatherbarrow argues that sites are not given, but constructed. The architecture project you create reveals the site.

Urban architecture, Leatherbarrow argues, should share space. He uses the word proportion, as in share the right amount. Just like at dinner. You may not eat as much as the person next to you, because you don’t have to. Good design always involves a donation of space to the public. It’s a sacrifice that makes the city better.

He gives three examples of this “sacrificing space.”

Palladio’s Palazzo Cheiricati 

ABI Building in Brazil

Tod Williams Billie Tsien’s  Skirkanich Hall

Part of sacrificing space is thickening the edge. The limit of your project should not be a line but a space.

It is this act of gift-giving of space that develops the common ground.

In contrast, Thom Mayne’s recent Cooper Union Building does not engage the public realm. It does not sacrifice for the benefit of the city. If you clicked on the link with the building, I would have to say I do not agree with the critics remarks about engaging the public. It does not. No where to sit. Barely an overhang to be sheltered from the rain or sun.

– – – – – –

About  city and society.

Richard Sennett’s The Fall of Public Man is an account of the modern attitude of our cities and space and how we interact with each other. I have not read it yet. Leatherbarrow warns us that it is pretty depressing, but we still need to read it. One way to look at cities is to see that all they are is circulation and police. We feel most comfortable at home. We have internalized the city. The car is the extension of the living room. Today, public does not equal shared, but unlimited access, accessibility.

– – – – – –

Is place a gradient then? If you set up the extremes:

Flow <- – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – -> Place

(circulation, continuous space)        (identity, regionalism, stability)

Many define the gradient as a blurred boundary. Leatherbarrow says it is not blurred. It is nuanced, exact, precise. There are structured, carefully constructed relationships that define space.

– – – – – – –

To be continued…and revised. I just like that architecture needs to be more giving. More in relation to its surroundings to give itself a stronger identity, and to be a good neighbor.

Up, Up, and Away!

May 16, 2012

Tomorrow I embark on a month long journey through Europe studying how cities and architecture there have given more space to water. I won a traveling fellowship through the School of Architecture and AIA Charlotte to fund my studies, which I’ll extend into my thesis year in the Master of architecture and urban design programs.

A few goals for the trip: I would like to talk to different planners, architects, engineers, designers, about how they are preparing for future changes in climate – like more flooding and storms. I want to learn more about how water is managed in cities – for example – how it is seen as a benefit, rather than a burden. I’m curious in the Rotterdam Climate Initiative and how they are building more space for water. This includes above ground storm water management (canals, etc). I’m also curious how architects are responding to the increasing possibility that water will be covering the area more frequently – are they designing floating structures? Or building up the land? Or other innovative solutions? Are there ecological solutions, like conserving the marshland and wetlands (these have absorbing powers) that planners are using in their cities?
So, I am interested in how these designs happen in architecture and also at a bigger scale in cities and future developments. I also dont know much about polders, so I want to learn about those! I’m really looking for forward thinkers who are being proactive about the future instead of reactive!
Here’s a general map of my travels (but subtract London and add Berlin)

Map of the travel stops

This is an example of the kinds of solutions I’m looking for – an idea that is multi beneficial across many needs: people, ecological, flooding protection, for example. Here’s a rendering I did of a Richard Serra sculpture in the Delaware River along Philadelphia’s coast that acts at once as a sea wall, public art, and ecological habitat.

Richard Serra public art seawall idea rendering

Richard Serra public art/seawall/habitat idea for Philadelphia I designed.

Matters of Place and Place Matters

April 24, 2012

I just recently wrote a ditty on my perceptions of place, how places “feel,” and what design elements make them feel this way. I found it to be a challenging topic – how do YOU define place? My goal is to get people to notice their environments, neighborhoods, and streets, a little more.  I’ve heard a few accounts of where this actually happened!

Read it here on PlanCharlotte.org.

 

NoDa, Charlotte streetscape