Archive for the 'installation art' Category

PARK(ing) Day, 2013

January 18, 2014

Yes, I realize the timing is a bit…late, but I thought I’d document just the same. In 2012 our PARK(ing) Day was in SouthEnd, adjacent to a popular Friday Food Truck rally. This year we aimed for NoDa, a neighborhood known for it’s artsy nature. We set up shop using local resources, of course! A tire place around the corner on 36th graciously let us borrow the tires for a few hours and the train tracks were a host of marvelous branches we painted and used for street trees. And, yes, you might ask, a few of those painted trees do live on as a decoration to a neighboring apartment door.

We set up a temporary tattoo parlor…yes, temporary tattoos, and temporarily set up. It was a huge hit, and a great way to break down the invisible barriers between strangers. This is my favorite part of the event – talking to those just walking by, often with confused expressions – which, of course, gives me a perfect segway into a conversation, explaining the oddities that are occurring where cars normally do. I liked the phrase that came up, “Park your butt, not your Buick.” We chose this street because there is a void of sitting space, especially as the narrow sidewalks crowd with concert-goers and the like. One 20 foot parking space can go a long way for creating new conversations, hearing stories, and enjoying the street life.

We had a “wishing tree” where people could hang their neighborhood wishes. Not Just Coffee and Smelly Cat were kind enough to donate/let us borrow some coffee bean bags. We had games, tattoos, and just a place to sit while you waited for your cab.

Before

Before

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Also a good space for picnics…

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And just when we packed up the last of the materials. Filled again. And how dead the space seems once more.

And just when we packed up the last of the materials. Filled again. And how dead the space seems once more.

*New* Scrap Exchange Space

May 6, 2013
before...

before…

 

These are the kinds of projects I like: quick, easy, cheap, and pack an impact punch!

Problem: Architecture students waste so many materials at the end of the year because they dont have anywhere to put them and they dont think they can use them again.

Solution: Take over an under utilized spray painting room and turn it into an organized place to store scrap materials for next semester. Every one saves TIME and MONEY. Hundreds of dollars of materials are saved from going in the dumpster! Hit this effort during the last week of school, make an impact, get people excited, get people motivated and willing to do just a little bit more.

We also played off of an existing campaign – Zero Waste has been adopted by the Football team. Why not use a little peer pressure and take on the same goals??

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Nicole Rivera is a trooper. She attacked the top!

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Before, from the doorway.

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After painting!

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After. We decided to keep some of the good graffiti for fun!

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X marks the spot for saving this graffiti!

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Free flat files from university surplus!

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the water line

January 22, 2013

the water line

I am interested in showing the presence of something that is absent…I’m also interested in how water lines mark, thinking of this as a mini model of flooding. This, of course, is a more every-day water mark we look right over.

“A Way of Looking at Things”

August 25, 2010

I recently, in one sitting, read the whole of Peter Zumthor’s book Thinking Architecture. I was reading in the quiet of the morning, in the living room, surrounded by bicycles and a soft, low light with the hum of the refrigerator a few rooms away to keep me company. Without music and only the steady hum of traffic outside the window, I was put into a contemplative state thinking about living and really experiencing good places, spaces.

From this reading, there forms within me the desire to capture the light and feeling of a place – and this house -which I’ve had mixed feelings and emotions within – there is some sense of it which just feels good. It’s that sense you cannot put a definition on.

Through his readings, Zumthor inspires me to BUILD things – to manifest them in this real world – off the paper, out of 2D, so that we may be able to explore a creation in all of its unspoken, subconscious forms.

Through his readings, too, I am filled with a driving sense to capture these living moments of the everyday – the lighting, the quiet, and how things are placed, just because its the course of life. (So, indeed, I got up and started capturing some of these moments with my new/old SLR.)

I also got this overwhelming desire to be in a quiet place, away from cars and people and noise to be surrounded by deep, quiet, forest, tall and confident, peaceful woods. There was a stirring in my heart, as if I needed to run there, but, sadly, I didnt know where to go! I need to find that place here in Charlotte. Nonetheless it was good to feel this pull.

Below I’ll interweave some of my favorite excerpts from the book.

My view of the room, the light, the quiet

“Since our feelings and understanding are rooted in the past, our sensuous connections with a building must respect the process of remembering.” (p18)

“In architecture there are two possibilities of spatial composition: the closed architecture body that isolates space within itself and the open body that embraces an area of space that is connected with the endless continuum.” (p22)

“I carefully observe the concrete appearance of the world, and in my buildings I try to enhance what seems to be valuable, to correct what is disturbing, and to create anew what we feel is missing.” (p24)

“A good building must be capable of absorbing the traces of human life and thus of taking on a specific richness.” (p24)

Through the french doors

“Why do we have so little confidence in the basic things architecture is made from? Material, structure, construction, bearing, being borne, earth and sky, and confidence in spaces that are really allowed to be spaces – spaces whose walls and constituent materials, concavity, emptiness, light, art, odor, receptivity, and resonance are handled with respect and care?” (p33)

When a building just seems to fit a site “it seems to be a part of the essence of its place, and at the same time it speaks of the world as a whole.” (p42)

I like the sequence of thresholds and the rhythm...

“The strength of a good design lies in ourselves and in our ability to perceive the world with both emotion and reason. A good architectural design is sensuous. A good architectural design is intelligent.” (p65)

“The intensity of a brief experience, the feeling of being utterly sustpended in time, beyond past and future – this belongs to many, perhaps even to all sensations of beauty. ..The flow of time has been halted, experience crystallized into an image whose beauty seems to indicate depth. While the feeling lasts, I have an inkling of the essence of things, of their most universal properties. I now suspect that these lie beyond any categories of thought.” (p72)

Morning breakfast with the book, I love the light.

“Beauty…is at its most intense when it is born of absence. I find something missing, a compelling expression, an empathy, which instantly affects me when I experience beauty…Longing. The experience of beauty makes me aware of absence. What I experience, what touches me, entails both joy and pain. Painful is the experience of absence and pure bliss the experience of a beautiful form that has been ignited by the feeling of absence.” (p80)

Postcards mark the entrance to my space, they add a vibrance.

“Architecture is the art of space and it is the art of time as well – between order and freedom, between follwoing a path and discovering a path of our own, wandering, strolling, being seduced.

I give thought to careful and conscious staging of tension between inside and outside, public and intimate, and to thresholds, transitions, and borders.” (p86)

**This is one of the things I like most about the house – the thresholds and rhythm of moving about the rooms. I dont know why, perhaps its the movement that I continually seek.

I like it's simplicity. It reminds me of a gallery space.

Summer Solstice in Maine

June 21, 2010

**Please see the comment section – a poem awaits you (complete with the audio from the author.)**

I knew I wouldn’t regret waking up at 5am on the Summer Solstice…and I’ve got some photos to prove it. (One thing the photos dont show are all the mosquitoes who also thought it would be a good time to get up and active..)

Due East

Due East. Morning look over the misty marsh

A nod to the light

Misty Morning Marsh

Sprinkled about

Structured web

morning look over the misty marsh
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Pearly web

dew laden

Pearly reflections

Textured Haze

Motion Mapping

June 4, 2010

Motion Mapping of bus route

Metro Line

These are a few line maps in a series of experiments I’ve conducted. It’s a visual representation of my body’s movement – dictated in a single line.

It’s something to pass the time, and patterns are fun to analyze. This particular bus route is completely straight, but it doesnt appear that way! While drawing I don’t look at the drawing, and I make sure to lock my wrist and my elbow. One fellow passenger thought I was a transportation analyst or a reporter. I suppose I could be!

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

In response to Daniel’s comment > The original concept or driver was the fact that I was spending so much time riding public transportation and feeling rather unproductive. On one such ride, I was trying to write, and, like all experiences writing in moving vehicles, it was all over the place and not legible, so I decided to just play into it. Locking my elbow and wrist as I sat, letting the motion of the bus or metro guide my pen, looking away and out the window as normal, not focusing on the drawing as it was produced. I learned to keep a certain amount of looseness in my hand to let the pen go where the road or the tracks led the bus or train car. I wanted to look for patterns and trends, and some you could see, but there are so many factors, even when I rode the same routes at nearly the same time, so many traffic and people conditions existed. It was really great seeing the differences between cities (DC, NYC, SF, Bar Harbor, ME) and the BART vs. CAL train vs. the Subway… I’ll post these examples soon.

In essence, I like lines. And there’s something about letting yourself go to the motion, instead of fighting it. It also made me more aware of the motion, and how much we move when we dont realize. Too bad I couldnt figure out a way to do this while biking…but I think I would need a bit more of a complex contraption…

But Does it Float

June 3, 2010

Another of my favorite Blogs – But Does it Float focuses on collections, introducing them with a statement – a caption of sorts.

One of my favorite entries: For the world to be interesting you have to be manipulating it all

MUSEUM "WAALSDORP" - Acoustic listening devices developed for the Dutch army as part of air defense systems research between World Wars 1 and 2.

Going to Texas? Check out Marfa

June 3, 2010

A friend recently visited Marfa, TX and raved about it. I thought I’d share. A unique town, and quite art-filled, there aren’t any chain stores or billboards. The Chinati Foundation was started there – which has a rather impressive collection.

It’s located in the SW corner of the state at a cross roads of sorts.

Here’s an NPR story about Donald Judd, one of the Foundation’s artists.

100 untitled works in mill aluminum, 1982-1986

Littlewood’s Law of Miracles

June 3, 2010

I’ve wanted to do an art project with this concept. Wouldn’t it be fun to “create” miracles for/with people?

Littlewood’s law states that one can expect a “miracle” to occur about once a month (according to his calculations).

Perhaps just having a positive interaction with a perfect stranger would be enough to trigger it… fun to think about..

How would you create a miracle for someone? What miracle occurred in your life in the last month?

installation art + …Alexandros Vasmoulakis

March 23, 2010

Alexandros Vasmoulakis portfolio

“His main purpose is to communicate.”