Archive for the 'Design' Category

RAW Design Build – Dakota 2017 – Outcropping

August 6, 2017

IMG_7636

Six years passed between my first RAW Design Build days and this year’s reunion was a great chance to revisit the kitchen/dining structures we built in 2011 and create a new destination on the 1000 acre tree farm outside of Custer, South Dakota.

This project was truly about working around nature – whether it was the almost daily rain and lighting shows, the quite chilly nights (we camped about a 5 minute walk away from the site), to the steep slopes, ever-varying rock faces, and weaving between bonsai-like pines and groves of aspen. This was a build-it-and-they-will-come project. It’s on the forefront of a vision to cultivate more outdoor experiences  and destinations on the land to encourage authentic outdoor activities (getting away from the variety of kitchy attractions that dot the area – Reptile Gardens, anyone?)

Ponderosa pines dominate the rocky terrain. Recently, the pine beetle’s wrath has allowed for new aspen groves to pop up, creating a new food source and habitat for deer and other critters. Julie Oswald, the client and owner of the property, said this year has been the year of the Aspen, as she’s been thinking a lot about how it fits into the overall forest management plan.

This year’s challenge was to create a place that could change the visitor’s view and perception of the place. How can we get visitors to look at the site differently? Scrambling on the rocks, I realized that there were a few different view ranges – one, below the canopy, through the valley – two, in the canopy of aspen and ponderosa pines, and three, above the canopy to the distant Black Hills.

Here are a few sketches thinking through initial concepts (shelter vs exposure, seeing above and below the canopy, framing views), key drawings that we based our lumber counts on and figured out structural components. Also included is the custom bracket detail (Drawn by Charley Umbarger).

It’s one thing to focus on the view and the big picture, and another to pay attention to the smaller details like the lichen thriving here. Zooming in, one notices the brave trees growing through slender cracks in the rock. Four different kinds of lichens and their vibrant colors are specifically sited on different rock faces. Shadows are constantly shifting across the varied surfaces. Trees sway in the breeze, cueing a vertigo feeling if you happen to be leaning on one while standing on the newly leveled surface.

We decided not to build on the very top because anything we build would do little to enhance what is already there. We chose a high rocky gap with a natural and easy to access slope up one side and a lower, corner-wrapping spot that will tie into a future campsite and provide adventurers a platform for rock sitting and scrambling up to a higher view. Each platform gives visitors a new experience that they would not have gotten the chance to experience otherwise.

Here are photos from the first 3 days – actually using our shelters built in 2011, exploring  the site and zooming into our locations, finding the floor height, locating columns, chiseling columns, pouring footings.

We had locals make custom brackets for our tree columns and the rock-to-beam interface. This next series shows the tree columns going vertical (ironic that they were once vertical and now it takes so much energy to get them vertical once again?) We couldn’t have done it without Andy’s help on his various pieces of machinery and extra tools. Beams and joists going in, and the space starts to form. We take a break and go to Sylvan Lake in Custer State Park. All this weaving between thunderstorms.

Time is our most challenging constraint (though nature is not far behind!) and we push on to get the finishing touches of the rim boards, scribing the rock for the decking (my personal favorite), railing design and decide how to treat the columns. We run out of time for benches. That could be a whole RAW assignment in itself. See below for the final shots!

I’m looking forward to going back soon to enjoy the space we’ve created!

2016 Makings

December 3, 2016

Here are some of my latest makings. I’ve been sewing birthday cards for my coworkers, as well as good-byes, and thank yous.

Gratitude

October 31, 2015

Change is hard. But gratitude and appreciation make it easier. Here are the latest collage creations for my coworkers before I transitioned into a new job. I think about the personality of each person as I make. It’s a way to guide decision making.

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Latest Makings

November 2, 2014

Here is my latest collection of collaged cards, petite postcards, wallets made from paycheck envelopes…

IMG_0644 IMG_0642 IMG_0744 IMG_0743 IMG_0745 IMG_0742 IMG_0643 IMG_0746

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Target drawstring saddle cover!

April 2, 2014

Target drawstring saddle cover!

I like the Target plastic bag design, so why not make it into a tailored bike seat cover? It’s also good camouflage for nicer saddles.

Underside view of the drawstring

Underside view of the drawstring

Bearings to Bicycle Bling

January 18, 2014

I admit that I sometimes peer into the trash, out of curiosity. You never know what you can find. I got lucky this particular time, when I spied a collar full of ball bearings – a part of a headset for a bike. My friend thought it was beyond its useful life. Because it is a cool object, I thought there must be some reuse…and sure enough – a necklace fits the bill!

necklace

Bike bearings as bicycle bling

Best of Map Made Cards

January 18, 2014

December was a rather prolific card/art making month. I picked up these maps from a librarian friend, and I, in turn, remade them and gave them to friends. Here are some of my favorites.

topo card

One of my favorites. Tracing topo.

card

Mapping and the void

card

Rivers and lines

card

I love the water lines

card

Together and apart

card

A Rapha advertisement turned postcard. Front and back shown.

These 10 were donated to a friend's art auction.

These 10 were donated to a friend’s art auction.

 

 

 

 

Cans to Cards

January 18, 2014

My business card holder-making has come back, this time with a Jam Session can from Noda Brewing Company. More to come on this venture!

Jam Session can to card holder

Jam Session can to card holder

Bicycle mechanic tool belt / apron

December 27, 2013

It has been too long since I had a good sewing project, so I leapt at the chance to tackle a request for a bicycle maintenance tool belt/shop apron. As it turns out, there aren’t very many other examples out there, so I did a little of my own customization. Working with a limited selection of fabric colors and weights made it extra fun. There are 7 big pockets, with 10 places to hold Allen keys or other tools/rags. It’s a woven grey now, but won’t be for long. The dirtier the better, because it will be getting used!

Tool belt - laid flat

Tool belt / Apron with 7 large pockets and 10 smaller places to stash Allen keys or other tools.

allen key holder detail

allen key holder detail

mechanic belt stitching detail

Stitching detail

Tool belt

Tool belt

Tool belt demonstration

Tool belt demonstration

Final Thesis: Saturating East Boulevard: Fusing Water and Public Space

May 8, 2013

Here’s a link to my final thesis document – Saturating East Boulevard (viewing at Issuu)

page view

Page view of the water walk.

thesis page view

Detail drawings of the water walk panel

thesis page view

Views of the process for making the tipping cup facade system

page view

Plan view drawing of pervious surfaces on this 2 block stretch of East Boulevard

Job searching and future opportunities

March 1, 2013

I graduate in May. You’ve probably met me, and I have probably directed you to this website.  I am going to be shameless put my portfolio and resume here, in hopes it will be an easy way to get to know me and to see my work.

Click to view my 2013 short portfolio. Here is the link to view a quick view of my thesis portfolio.

Here is my resume in the pdf version: KeihlyMoore_Resume2013_web

Clickable version that gets bigger:

KeihlyMoore_Resume2013_web

street section builder…

February 21, 2013

street section builder

 

This just in for all you urban designer / street geeks!

What could be more fun that playing around with how to design a street? 🙂

http://streetmix.net/

 

DIY street experiments

February 12, 2013
The case for separated bike lanes  (source: Atlantic Cities)

The case for separated bike lanes (source: Atlantic Cities)

Since I’ve taken bicycling seriously in the city I’ve really started to pay a lot more attention to the streets – the widths, the speeds, the potholes, the jerks, the friendly faces (I’ve noticed I have more eye contact with people when I’m on my bike), the connectivity and lack of. You see a lot more when you’re on a bike, then when you’re in a car, I’ve found.

Here’s an article that is quite inspiring…

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2012/08/case-separated-bike-lanes/3015/

furry frosty

January 22, 2013

furry frosty

This is what a rain storm followed by a winter storm (in NC) will give you. The doors were stuck shut, the first time that’s happened this winter season. I appreciate the pattern and texture.

the water line

January 22, 2013

the water line

I am interested in showing the presence of something that is absent…I’m also interested in how water lines mark, thinking of this as a mini model of flooding. This, of course, is a more every-day water mark we look right over.

moving, migrating ‘mericans : Forbes map

January 21, 2013

moving, migrating 'mericans : Forbes map

I just can’t stop looking at this fun map…

http://www.forbes.com/special-report/2011/migration.html

Rich blocks, poor blocks

January 21, 2013

Rich blocks, poor blocks

This site visualizes income data per neighborhood. Very interesting.

http://www.richblockspoorblocks.com/

Sugar Creek Storming

January 17, 2013

I took this video at 9am this morning. Today the greenway is impassable, but that’s okay. I’ll let the river have more room. This is a good use of space and water management. It’s also interesting to watch the water line move up and down.

Thank yous

January 14, 2013

For some reason I really enjoy making thank you cards and postcards. I get into this introspective mood and realize how much there is to be grateful for. I think about the person as I make it (even if I dont know them very well), and somehow that informs my decision making process, in a strange, sub-conscious kind of way. Here are a few of my latest.

Rome + waves

Rome + waves

 

Berlin + waves

Berlin + waves

Stockholm pictures

Stockholm pictures

Japanese subway as music

January 11, 2013

I found this article at Atlantic Cities:
http://www.theatlanticcities.com/arts-and-lifestyle/2012/10/japanese-subway-train-composed-music/3445/

I’ve been thinking about sound and space recently, and this caught my attention. Quite imaginative!

the whole view

January 11, 2013

the whole view

This is what 9 christmas trees look like in a little dining room. They are quite friendly, and their fragrance, sparkled with orange scent, is marvelous.

 

I should also note how the trees exited the house…much faster than hauling them back down the stairs.

tree exit

tree exit

 

x-mas x-hibition

January 11, 2013

x-mas x-hibition

What does it look like to have 9 christmas trees in your dining room? This is the thought that crossed my mind when walking past strewn-to-the-curb christmas trees. My friend provided his dining room in Boston for the staging.

Census dot map

January 10, 2013

Census dot map

Check out this great map made by Brandon Martin-Anderson.
There is one dot for every person in the US and Canada. Here is his website: http://bmander.com/dotmap/index.html

The ABCs of Architects

January 10, 2013

This is a fun diagram-like portrayal of a few of the famous architects and their projects. It’s short, sweet, and colorful.

Here’s the link if the video doesn’t play : http://vimeo.com/56974716

Common Ground and my architectural philosophy

October 15, 2012

Today, after a class discussion with David Leatherbarrow, I think I am closer to finding another piece of my personal philosophy on architecture.

Here I will try to articulate what I’ve learned. Know that I’m still in processing mode and thoughts will change, add, and grow on these issues. Many of these statements are quotes from David.

ARCHITECTURE NEEDS TO BE MORE GENEROUS. There I said it. It takes courage to give the heart of the ground floor, the heart of the building, over to the  public. (Leatherbarrow)

In Architecture we want to articulate our individuality, rather than what we share. Is there any common ground? Leatherbarrow argues that sites are not given, but constructed. The architecture project you create reveals the site.

Urban architecture, Leatherbarrow argues, should share space. He uses the word proportion, as in share the right amount. Just like at dinner. You may not eat as much as the person next to you, because you don’t have to. Good design always involves a donation of space to the public. It’s a sacrifice that makes the city better.

He gives three examples of this “sacrificing space.”

Palladio’s Palazzo Cheiricati 

ABI Building in Brazil

Tod Williams Billie Tsien’s  Skirkanich Hall

Part of sacrificing space is thickening the edge. The limit of your project should not be a line but a space.

It is this act of gift-giving of space that develops the common ground.

In contrast, Thom Mayne’s recent Cooper Union Building does not engage the public realm. It does not sacrifice for the benefit of the city. If you clicked on the link with the building, I would have to say I do not agree with the critics remarks about engaging the public. It does not. No where to sit. Barely an overhang to be sheltered from the rain or sun.

– – – – – –

About  city and society.

Richard Sennett’s The Fall of Public Man is an account of the modern attitude of our cities and space and how we interact with each other. I have not read it yet. Leatherbarrow warns us that it is pretty depressing, but we still need to read it. One way to look at cities is to see that all they are is circulation and police. We feel most comfortable at home. We have internalized the city. The car is the extension of the living room. Today, public does not equal shared, but unlimited access, accessibility.

– – – – – –

Is place a gradient then? If you set up the extremes:

Flow <- – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – -> Place

(circulation, continuous space)        (identity, regionalism, stability)

Many define the gradient as a blurred boundary. Leatherbarrow says it is not blurred. It is nuanced, exact, precise. There are structured, carefully constructed relationships that define space.

– – – – – – –

To be continued…and revised. I just like that architecture needs to be more giving. More in relation to its surroundings to give itself a stronger identity, and to be a good neighbor.

PlanCharlotte Additions

October 15, 2012

I need to write a ‘shout-out’ to our budding PlanCharlotte site! The site covers issues shaping growth in the Charlotte region.

I’ve had a part in the following articles:

May 25: Charlotte’s Great Walls. Here I examine some particularly blank and centralized walls and imagine things to do with them.

July 6: It’s Hip to be (a Water) Square. This article articulates a few of the things I learned on my Traveling Fellowship and ties our flooding condition to Charlotte. This will also roll into my thesis topic and these questions will consume my life for the next few months!

July 31: Eastland Mall, What’s Next? Some Options. Charlotte has a dead mall on it’s hands and here our research presents other now-living mall ideas.

September 11: Parking for Cars or PARK(ing) for People? I led Charlotte’s first (official- street level) PARK(ing) Day. (The first was in a parking lot in 2008 by Deb Ryan and her students.) I held it in SouthEnd and major organizing took place over just 2 weeks! It all came together wonderfully with borrowed materials!

October 3: Hitting the Streets, with Parks. This is my follow up article of the very successful event!

 

Up, Up, and Away!

May 16, 2012

Tomorrow I embark on a month long journey through Europe studying how cities and architecture there have given more space to water. I won a traveling fellowship through the School of Architecture and AIA Charlotte to fund my studies, which I’ll extend into my thesis year in the Master of architecture and urban design programs.

A few goals for the trip: I would like to talk to different planners, architects, engineers, designers, about how they are preparing for future changes in climate – like more flooding and storms. I want to learn more about how water is managed in cities – for example – how it is seen as a benefit, rather than a burden. I’m curious in the Rotterdam Climate Initiative and how they are building more space for water. This includes above ground storm water management (canals, etc). I’m also curious how architects are responding to the increasing possibility that water will be covering the area more frequently – are they designing floating structures? Or building up the land? Or other innovative solutions? Are there ecological solutions, like conserving the marshland and wetlands (these have absorbing powers) that planners are using in their cities?
So, I am interested in how these designs happen in architecture and also at a bigger scale in cities and future developments. I also dont know much about polders, so I want to learn about those! I’m really looking for forward thinkers who are being proactive about the future instead of reactive!
Here’s a general map of my travels (but subtract London and add Berlin)

Map of the travel stops

This is an example of the kinds of solutions I’m looking for – an idea that is multi beneficial across many needs: people, ecological, flooding protection, for example. Here’s a rendering I did of a Richard Serra sculpture in the Delaware River along Philadelphia’s coast that acts at once as a sea wall, public art, and ecological habitat.

Richard Serra public art seawall idea rendering

Richard Serra public art/seawall/habitat idea for Philadelphia I designed.

Pallet Place Farm?

April 24, 2012

Pallet fence idea for the Charlotte Urban Farm Project

When I walked out of my “home” at the UNCC Center City Building to check out what Lindsey and Allen were doing at their new farm site on the corner of 8th Street and Brevard I was immediately put to work (and seriously, how could I expect anything different?) I was tasked with designing a pallet fence. This week also happens to be FINALS week, so there is lots going on. But, because I’m a productive multi-tasking procrastinator I find useful things to do instead of the things I really should be doing, and this little project fits the bill! It was also a challenge to do a quick charrette and see how fast I could render something. With the help of fellow Urban Design student, Adam Martin, we came up with this easy-to-construct design. We’ll be doing some actual testing in the next few weeks to get the site secured.

Check out the Charlotte Urban Farm Project’s website! http://www.clturbanfarm.org/

I also thought it would be a good idea to do some vertical gardening projects in uptown on some of the blank walls, so I’m in the process of finding the right people to talk to to make that happen. Here are some of my ideas: http://cargocollective.com/the_spacebetween/Green-on-gray

Matters of Place and Place Matters

April 24, 2012

I just recently wrote a ditty on my perceptions of place, how places “feel,” and what design elements make them feel this way. I found it to be a challenging topic – how do YOU define place? My goal is to get people to notice their environments, neighborhoods, and streets, a little more.  I’ve heard a few accounts of where this actually happened!

Read it here on PlanCharlotte.org.

 

NoDa, Charlotte streetscape

Business card holders, right when you need them.

December 8, 2011

So, today I was in a quiet sort of mood. Self reflecting, wanting to make. Rain dripped intermittently throughout the day, the robins and nuthatches were active and calling, the wind was mixing the wind chimes. And so I made. I was also in a mood to give away, and mixed with the dose of practicality that I must always have when making such things, I chose these business card holders made of soda cans.. tonight was also a night when 8 of us Urban Designer grad student types acted as facilitators to a South End Charlotte neighborhood development charrette organized by Charlotte Center City Partners. One of my classmates got cards from her group members, and what a perfect place to put them in a recycled can holder! So there you have it. Here are the 2nd life aluminums that will take a new meaning in life:

Here they are, ready to go out into the world again.

They are quite handy – flexible, so you can bend them to accomodate your needs. I assure you they have not ever cut me, but I cannot guaranteed you wont do that to yourself. I do sand the edges.

Would you like one? Just let me know!

Cannily,

Keihly