Archive for the 'Architecture' Category

Gratitude

October 31, 2015

Change is hard. But gratitude and appreciate make it easier. Here are the latest collage creations for my coworkers before I transitioned into a new job. I think about the personality of each person as I make. It’s a way to guide decision making.

IMG_2777 IMG_2778 IMG_2779 IMG_2782 IMG_2788 IMG_2786 IMG_2718 IMG_2719 IMG_2720 IMG_2721 IMG_2718 IMG_2780

Final Thesis: Saturating East Boulevard: Fusing Water and Public Space

May 8, 2013

Here’s a link to my final thesis document – Saturating East Boulevard (viewing at Issuu)

page view

Page view of the water walk.

thesis page view

Detail drawings of the water walk panel

thesis page view

Views of the process for making the tipping cup facade system

page view

Plan view drawing of pervious surfaces on this 2 block stretch of East Boulevard

Job searching and future opportunities

March 1, 2013

I graduate in May. You’ve probably met me, and I have probably directed you to this website.  I am going to be shameless put my portfolio and resume here, in hopes it will be an easy way to get to know me and to see my work.

Click to view my 2013 short portfolio. Here is the link to view a quick view of my thesis portfolio.

Here is my resume in the pdf version: KeihlyMoore_Resume2013_web

Clickable version that gets bigger:

KeihlyMoore_Resume2013_web

The ABCs of Architects

January 10, 2013

This is a fun diagram-like portrayal of a few of the famous architects and their projects. It’s short, sweet, and colorful.

Here’s the link if the video doesn’t play : http://vimeo.com/56974716

Common Ground and my architectural philosophy

October 15, 2012

Today, after a class discussion with David Leatherbarrow, I think I am closer to finding another piece of my personal philosophy on architecture.

Here I will try to articulate what I’ve learned. Know that I’m still in processing mode and thoughts will change, add, and grow on these issues. Many of these statements are quotes from David.

ARCHITECTURE NEEDS TO BE MORE GENEROUS. There I said it. It takes courage to give the heart of the ground floor, the heart of the building, over to the  public. (Leatherbarrow)

In Architecture we want to articulate our individuality, rather than what we share. Is there any common ground? Leatherbarrow argues that sites are not given, but constructed. The architecture project you create reveals the site.

Urban architecture, Leatherbarrow argues, should share space. He uses the word proportion, as in share the right amount. Just like at dinner. You may not eat as much as the person next to you, because you don’t have to. Good design always involves a donation of space to the public. It’s a sacrifice that makes the city better.

He gives three examples of this “sacrificing space.”

Palladio’s Palazzo Cheiricati 

ABI Building in Brazil

Tod Williams Billie Tsien’s  Skirkanich Hall

Part of sacrificing space is thickening the edge. The limit of your project should not be a line but a space.

It is this act of gift-giving of space that develops the common ground.

In contrast, Thom Mayne’s recent Cooper Union Building does not engage the public realm. It does not sacrifice for the benefit of the city. If you clicked on the link with the building, I would have to say I do not agree with the critics remarks about engaging the public. It does not. No where to sit. Barely an overhang to be sheltered from the rain or sun.

– – – – – –

About  city and society.

Richard Sennett’s The Fall of Public Man is an account of the modern attitude of our cities and space and how we interact with each other. I have not read it yet. Leatherbarrow warns us that it is pretty depressing, but we still need to read it. One way to look at cities is to see that all they are is circulation and police. We feel most comfortable at home. We have internalized the city. The car is the extension of the living room. Today, public does not equal shared, but unlimited access, accessibility.

– – – – – –

Is place a gradient then? If you set up the extremes:

Flow <- – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – -> Place

(circulation, continuous space)        (identity, regionalism, stability)

Many define the gradient as a blurred boundary. Leatherbarrow says it is not blurred. It is nuanced, exact, precise. There are structured, carefully constructed relationships that define space.

– – – – – – –

To be continued…and revised. I just like that architecture needs to be more giving. More in relation to its surroundings to give itself a stronger identity, and to be a good neighbor.

PlanCharlotte Additions

October 15, 2012

I need to write a ‘shout-out’ to our budding PlanCharlotte site! The site covers issues shaping growth in the Charlotte region.

I’ve had a part in the following articles:

May 25: Charlotte’s Great Walls. Here I examine some particularly blank and centralized walls and imagine things to do with them.

July 6: It’s Hip to be (a Water) Square. This article articulates a few of the things I learned on my Traveling Fellowship and ties our flooding condition to Charlotte. This will also roll into my thesis topic and these questions will consume my life for the next few months!

July 31: Eastland Mall, What’s Next? Some Options. Charlotte has a dead mall on it’s hands and here our research presents other now-living mall ideas.

September 11: Parking for Cars or PARK(ing) for People? I led Charlotte’s first (official- street level) PARK(ing) Day. (The first was in a parking lot in 2008 by Deb Ryan and her students.) I held it in SouthEnd and major organizing took place over just 2 weeks! It all came together wonderfully with borrowed materials!

October 3: Hitting the Streets, with Parks. This is my follow up article of the very successful event!

 

Up, Up, and Away!

May 16, 2012

Tomorrow I embark on a month long journey through Europe studying how cities and architecture there have given more space to water. I won a traveling fellowship through the School of Architecture and AIA Charlotte to fund my studies, which I’ll extend into my thesis year in the Master of architecture and urban design programs.

A few goals for the trip: I would like to talk to different planners, architects, engineers, designers, about how they are preparing for future changes in climate – like more flooding and storms. I want to learn more about how water is managed in cities – for example – how it is seen as a benefit, rather than a burden. I’m curious in the Rotterdam Climate Initiative and how they are building more space for water. This includes above ground storm water management (canals, etc). I’m also curious how architects are responding to the increasing possibility that water will be covering the area more frequently – are they designing floating structures? Or building up the land? Or other innovative solutions? Are there ecological solutions, like conserving the marshland and wetlands (these have absorbing powers) that planners are using in their cities?
So, I am interested in how these designs happen in architecture and also at a bigger scale in cities and future developments. I also dont know much about polders, so I want to learn about those! I’m really looking for forward thinkers who are being proactive about the future instead of reactive!
Here’s a general map of my travels (but subtract London and add Berlin)

Map of the travel stops

This is an example of the kinds of solutions I’m looking for – an idea that is multi beneficial across many needs: people, ecological, flooding protection, for example. Here’s a rendering I did of a Richard Serra sculpture in the Delaware River along Philadelphia’s coast that acts at once as a sea wall, public art, and ecological habitat.

Richard Serra public art seawall idea rendering

Richard Serra public art/seawall/habitat idea for Philadelphia I designed.

Madison New Media studio project

December 24, 2010

first piece of the formwork - first part of the experiment

Let me introduce you to my final models for my comprehensive studio project. (The first is a 3/8″ section model – 8″ wide, 30″ long, 24″ tall, the second is a 1/16″ full building model – 13″ x 9″ x 5″.) (I am in a dual masters program in architecture and urban design). I figured they deserve a post, as I spent oh so many hours thinking, toiling, experimenting, and hoping that the experiments would work. Having never poured concrete before, I had some learning to do. Fortunately the studio motto by many is “it takes a village” and many people were really generous in sharing their experiences, tips and tools. I used Rockite – basically a really quick setting, fine concrete. Formwork, I learned, is tricky, because you have to think of the opposite of your shape, and in my case, I needed to think of my structure horizontally, instead of vertically. These images of the formwork are the five floors laying horizontally, they will all be put together in the final images.

after the first pour - I like to think it was hatched. I completed it in four pours, so I got a lovely variation in color tones.

The one thing I dont like about this process is the waste of the formwork – foam core in my case – something for me to take into consideration in the future.

after spending 50+ hours working on how to set this up, it's finally built!

Working from a computer 3D model, then figuring things out in the “field” with exact measurements took quite a while. I decided to add another slight detail by beveling the footings which tested my ability to cut 45 deg angles by hand in the foam core and remembering to always think about how the edges will show -as every texture shows itself in this game (whether its intentional or not). In fact, I had a friend who did a pour and used a piece of foam core that had had soup spilled on it – he cleaned it off, figuring that it would work just fine. The soup had absorbed just enough to change the color of the concrete in that spot!

finished formwork for the big pour! check out all the support!

It’s hard to say if the concrete is really going to stay in its bounds, and how strong the foam core is going to hold up.

during the pour + no leaks! success!

It was a proud moment when I realized the base was level and balanced! It’s square!

texture from the metal screen I put in the formwork - I like the irregularities.

all the pieces together! (roof constructed out of wood)

detail view looking into the core - see the inlaid wood shelving...

detail showing the texture, the core, the balconies, and the LCD screens

front view showing the media LCD screens

here, the relationship between the LCDs and the viewing balconies

And now for a look at the 1/16th inch scale model. (I made tracks out of wood, so the screens move.)

top view of the full building - clear acrylic floor plates show the columns connecting through the floor plates

north facade

south facade

east facade - LCD screens

roof deck looking out to the lake to the northwest

screens can slide, allowing users to adjust the interior light; here the LCD screens are shown on the east facade

detail of the screens...gaps show the space between interior programs

the screens move! you can make your own moire effect!

 

Now! What to do with these things? I’m thinking the large model could be used as a book shelf, spice shelf, plant shelf…. any other ideas??

“A Way of Looking at Things”

August 25, 2010

I recently, in one sitting, read the whole of Peter Zumthor’s book Thinking Architecture. I was reading in the quiet of the morning, in the living room, surrounded by bicycles and a soft, low light with the hum of the refrigerator a few rooms away to keep me company. Without music and only the steady hum of traffic outside the window, I was put into a contemplative state thinking about living and really experiencing good places, spaces.

From this reading, there forms within me the desire to capture the light and feeling of a place – and this house -which I’ve had mixed feelings and emotions within – there is some sense of it which just feels good. It’s that sense you cannot put a definition on.

Through his readings, Zumthor inspires me to BUILD things – to manifest them in this real world – off the paper, out of 2D, so that we may be able to explore a creation in all of its unspoken, subconscious forms.

Through his readings, too, I am filled with a driving sense to capture these living moments of the everyday – the lighting, the quiet, and how things are placed, just because its the course of life. (So, indeed, I got up and started capturing some of these moments with my new/old SLR.)

I also got this overwhelming desire to be in a quiet place, away from cars and people and noise to be surrounded by deep, quiet, forest, tall and confident, peaceful woods. There was a stirring in my heart, as if I needed to run there, but, sadly, I didnt know where to go! I need to find that place here in Charlotte. Nonetheless it was good to feel this pull.

Below I’ll interweave some of my favorite excerpts from the book.

My view of the room, the light, the quiet

“Since our feelings and understanding are rooted in the past, our sensuous connections with a building must respect the process of remembering.” (p18)

“In architecture there are two possibilities of spatial composition: the closed architecture body that isolates space within itself and the open body that embraces an area of space that is connected with the endless continuum.” (p22)

“I carefully observe the concrete appearance of the world, and in my buildings I try to enhance what seems to be valuable, to correct what is disturbing, and to create anew what we feel is missing.” (p24)

“A good building must be capable of absorbing the traces of human life and thus of taking on a specific richness.” (p24)

Through the french doors

“Why do we have so little confidence in the basic things architecture is made from? Material, structure, construction, bearing, being borne, earth and sky, and confidence in spaces that are really allowed to be spaces – spaces whose walls and constituent materials, concavity, emptiness, light, art, odor, receptivity, and resonance are handled with respect and care?” (p33)

When a building just seems to fit a site “it seems to be a part of the essence of its place, and at the same time it speaks of the world as a whole.” (p42)

I like the sequence of thresholds and the rhythm...

“The strength of a good design lies in ourselves and in our ability to perceive the world with both emotion and reason. A good architectural design is sensuous. A good architectural design is intelligent.” (p65)

“The intensity of a brief experience, the feeling of being utterly sustpended in time, beyond past and future – this belongs to many, perhaps even to all sensations of beauty. ..The flow of time has been halted, experience crystallized into an image whose beauty seems to indicate depth. While the feeling lasts, I have an inkling of the essence of things, of their most universal properties. I now suspect that these lie beyond any categories of thought.” (p72)

Morning breakfast with the book, I love the light.

“Beauty…is at its most intense when it is born of absence. I find something missing, a compelling expression, an empathy, which instantly affects me when I experience beauty…Longing. The experience of beauty makes me aware of absence. What I experience, what touches me, entails both joy and pain. Painful is the experience of absence and pure bliss the experience of a beautiful form that has been ignited by the feeling of absence.” (p80)

Postcards mark the entrance to my space, they add a vibrance.

“Architecture is the art of space and it is the art of time as well – between order and freedom, between follwoing a path and discovering a path of our own, wandering, strolling, being seduced.

I give thought to careful and conscious staging of tension between inside and outside, public and intimate, and to thresholds, transitions, and borders.” (p86)

**This is one of the things I like most about the house – the thresholds and rhythm of moving about the rooms. I dont know why, perhaps its the movement that I continually seek.

I like it's simplicity. It reminds me of a gallery space.

But Does it Float

June 3, 2010

Another of my favorite Blogs – But Does it Float focuses on collections, introducing them with a statement – a caption of sorts.

One of my favorite entries: For the world to be interesting you have to be manipulating it all

MUSEUM "WAALSDORP" - Acoustic listening devices developed for the Dutch army as part of air defense systems research between World Wars 1 and 2.

Unhappy Hipsters

June 3, 2010

One of my favorites – Unhappy Hipsters author finds scenes of Modernist architecture and creates the captions, which are all too fitting.

Burial ground or not, it was unquestionable that Ruby saw dead people. (Photo: Hertha Hurnaus; Dwell)