Target drawstring saddle cover!

April 2, 2014

Target drawstring saddle cover!

I like the Target plastic bag design, so why not make it into a tailored bike seat cover? It’s also good camouflage for nicer saddles.

Underside view of the drawstring

Underside view of the drawstring


PARK(ing) Day, 2013

January 18, 2014

Yes, I realize the timing is a bit…late, but I thought I’d document just the same. In 2012 our PARK(ing) Day was in SouthEnd, adjacent to a popular Friday Food Truck rally. This year we aimed for NoDa, a neighborhood known for it’s artsy nature. We set up shop using local resources, of course! A tire place around the corner on 36th graciously let us borrow the tires for a few hours and the train tracks were a host of marvelous branches we painted and used for street trees. And, yes, you might ask, a few of those painted trees do live on as a decoration to a neighboring apartment door.

We set up a temporary tattoo parlor…yes, temporary tattoos, and temporarily set up. It was a huge hit, and a great way to break down the invisible barriers between strangers. This is my favorite part of the event – talking to those just walking by, often with confused expressions – which, of course, gives me a perfect segway into a conversation, explaining the oddities that are occurring where cars normally do. I liked the phrase that came up, “Park your butt, not your Buick.” We chose this street because there is a void of sitting space, especially as the narrow sidewalks crowd with concert-goers and the like. One 20 foot parking space can go a long way for creating new conversations, hearing stories, and enjoying the street life.

We had a “wishing tree” where people could hang their neighborhood wishes. Not Just Coffee and Smelly Cat were kind enough to donate/let us borrow some coffee bean bags. We had games, tattoos, and just a place to sit while you waited for your cab.

Before

Before

IMG_6885

Also a good space for picnics…

IMG_6895 IMG_6891 IMG_6864 IMG_6901 IMG_6892 IMG_6913 IMG_6875 IMG_6905 IMG_6882 IMG_6874

And just when we packed up the last of the materials. Filled again. And how dead the space seems once more.

And just when we packed up the last of the materials. Filled again. And how dead the space seems once more.


Bearings to Bicycle Bling

January 18, 2014

I admit that I sometimes peer into the trash, out of curiosity. You never know what you can find. I got lucky this particular time, when I spied a collar full of ball bearings – a part of a headset for a bike. My friend thought it was beyond its useful life. Because it is a cool object, I thought there must be some reuse…and sure enough – a necklace fits the bill!

necklace

Bike bearings as bicycle bling


Best of Map Made Cards

January 18, 2014

December was a rather prolific card/art making month. I picked up these maps from a librarian friend, and I, in turn, remade them and gave them to friends. Here are some of my favorites.

topo card

One of my favorites. Tracing topo.

card

Mapping and the void

card

Rivers and lines

card

I love the water lines

card

Together and apart

card

A Rapha advertisement turned postcard. Front and back shown.

These 10 were donated to a friend's art auction.

These 10 were donated to a friend’s art auction.

 

 

 

 


Cans to Cards

January 18, 2014

My business card holder-making has come back, this time with a Jam Session can from Noda Brewing Company. More to come on this venture!

Jam Session can to card holder

Jam Session can to card holder


Bicycle mechanic tool belt / apron

December 27, 2013

It has been too long since I had a good sewing project, so I leapt at the chance to tackle a request for a bicycle maintenance tool belt/shop apron. As it turns out, there aren’t very many other examples out there, so I did a little of my own customization. Working with a limited selection of fabric colors and weights made it extra fun. There are 7 big pockets, with 10 places to hold Allen keys or other tools/rags. It’s a woven grey now, but won’t be for long. The dirtier the better, because it will be getting used!

Tool belt - laid flat

Tool belt / Apron with 7 large pockets and 10 smaller places to stash Allen keys or other tools.

allen key holder detail

allen key holder detail

mechanic belt stitching detail

Stitching detail

Tool belt

Tool belt

Tool belt demonstration

Tool belt demonstration


Final Thesis: Saturating East Boulevard: Fusing Water and Public Space

May 8, 2013

Here’s a link to my final thesis document – Saturating East Boulevard (viewing at Issuu)

page view

Page view of the water walk.

thesis page view

Detail drawings of the water walk panel

thesis page view

Views of the process for making the tipping cup facade system

page view

Plan view drawing of pervious surfaces on this 2 block stretch of East Boulevard


*New* Scrap Exchange Space

May 6, 2013
before...

before…

 

These are the kinds of projects I like: quick, easy, cheap, and pack an impact punch!

Problem: Architecture students waste so many materials at the end of the year because they dont have anywhere to put them and they dont think they can use them again.

Solution: Take over an under utilized spray painting room and turn it into an organized place to store scrap materials for next semester. Every one saves TIME and MONEY. Hundreds of dollars of materials are saved from going in the dumpster! Hit this effort during the last week of school, make an impact, get people excited, get people motivated and willing to do just a little bit more.

We also played off of an existing campaign – Zero Waste has been adopted by the Football team. Why not use a little peer pressure and take on the same goals??

IMG_5633

Nicole Rivera is a trooper. She attacked the top!

IMG_5531

Before, from the doorway.

IMG_5643

After painting!

IMG_5644

After. We decided to keep some of the good graffiti for fun!

IMG_5628

X marks the spot for saving this graffiti!

IMG_5641

Free flat files from university surplus!

IMG_5651 IMG_5652


Job searching and future opportunities

March 1, 2013

I graduate in May. You’ve probably met me, and I have probably directed you to this website.  I am going to be shameless put my portfolio and resume here, in hopes it will be an easy way to get to know me and to see my work.

Click to view my 2013 short portfolio. Here is the link to view a quick view of my thesis portfolio.

Here is my resume in the pdf version: KeihlyMoore_Resume2013_web

Clickable version that gets bigger:

KeihlyMoore_Resume2013_web


street section builder…

February 21, 2013

street section builder

 

This just in for all you urban designer / street geeks!

What could be more fun that playing around with how to design a street? :)

http://streetmix.net/

 


water bottle follies

February 20, 2013

So, the other day I was doing a bicycle experiment with my friend. We were riding the bike share bcycles and I had my waterbottle in the basket. I was going fast down 7th Ave, headed away from uptown, and I hit a bump…watch what happens.. (click on the image to activate…)

Water bottle gymnastics


snow, really, for the first time in 2 years!

February 17, 2013

I couldnt help but get excited to see snow in Charlotte. It had been the first accumulation in 2 years. Although it hardly holds a shovel to the inches I’ve seen in Minnesota, excitement still bubbled up inside me. I’ll never tire of seeing the snow etched branches overlapping in the sky, their outlines creating infinite patterns.


DIY street experiments

February 12, 2013
The case for separated bike lanes  (source: Atlantic Cities)

The case for separated bike lanes (source: Atlantic Cities)

Since I’ve taken bicycling seriously in the city I’ve really started to pay a lot more attention to the streets – the widths, the speeds, the potholes, the jerks, the friendly faces (I’ve noticed I have more eye contact with people when I’m on my bike), the connectivity and lack of. You see a lot more when you’re on a bike, then when you’re in a car, I’ve found.

Here’s an article that is quite inspiring…

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2012/08/case-separated-bike-lanes/3015/


furry frosty

January 22, 2013

furry frosty

This is what a rain storm followed by a winter storm (in NC) will give you. The doors were stuck shut, the first time that’s happened this winter season. I appreciate the pattern and texture.


the water line

January 22, 2013

the water line

I am interested in showing the presence of something that is absent…I’m also interested in how water lines mark, thinking of this as a mini model of flooding. This, of course, is a more every-day water mark we look right over.


moving, migrating ‘mericans : Forbes map

January 21, 2013

moving, migrating 'mericans : Forbes map

I just can’t stop looking at this fun map…

http://www.forbes.com/special-report/2011/migration.html


Rich blocks, poor blocks

January 21, 2013

Rich blocks, poor blocks

This site visualizes income data per neighborhood. Very interesting.

http://www.richblockspoorblocks.com/


stretched to the end

January 20, 2013

stretched to the end

A friend sent me a picture of the wallet I made him some 3 years ago. He tried to make it last forever. I’d say he did pretty good. I’m really impressed he used it so well. I like to see the things I make wear and travel. I still remember this mesh came from a rice sack from Mexico, found in Illinois. The plastic edging came from a bag found in NYC. The wallet has lived in Iowa.


Sugar Creek Storming

January 17, 2013

I took this video at 9am this morning. Today the greenway is impassable, but that’s okay. I’ll let the river have more room. This is a good use of space and water management. It’s also interesting to watch the water line move up and down.


Thank yous

January 14, 2013

For some reason I really enjoy making thank you cards and postcards. I get into this introspective mood and realize how much there is to be grateful for. I think about the person as I make it (even if I dont know them very well), and somehow that informs my decision making process, in a strange, sub-conscious kind of way. Here are a few of my latest.

Rome + waves

Rome + waves

 

Berlin + waves

Berlin + waves

Stockholm pictures

Stockholm pictures


coy koi, okoy?

January 14, 2013

I need to keep track of the things I make. This particular found-fabric found its way into my latest gift projects quite easily. I started with the apron – for a favorite chef of mine. The vertical piece turns into a towel hook over the koi fish pocket. If you’re into cycling, I was inspired by Rapha’s clothing line off center design.

koi fish apron

koi fish apron

And then I made an all purpose pouch. Friends have turned them into wallets, card holders, places to carry flash drives, phone cases…it’s just fun and versatile.

fish all-purpose pouch

fish all-purpose pouch

And last, but not least, are my koi pot-holders/hot pads. It’s fun covering poorly designed ones with whatever design you want! Plus you get an extra layer of fabric protection….

Potholders / hot pads

Potholders / hot pads

Do you have other ideas you could see with this kind of fabric? I’ve got a little big left….

 


Japanese subway as music

January 11, 2013

I found this article at Atlantic Cities:

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/arts-and-lifestyle/2012/10/japanese-subway-train-composed-music/3445/

I’ve been thinking about sound and space recently, and this caught my attention. Quite imaginative!


the whole view

January 11, 2013

the whole view

This is what 9 christmas trees look like in a little dining room. They are quite friendly, and their fragrance, sparkled with orange scent, is marvelous.

 

I should also note how the trees exited the house…much faster than hauling them back down the stairs.

tree exit

tree exit

 


x-mas x-hibition

January 11, 2013

x-mas x-hibition

What does it look like to have 9 christmas trees in your dining room? This is the thought that crossed my mind when walking past strewn-to-the-curb christmas trees. My friend provided his dining room in Boston for the staging.


Census dot map

January 10, 2013

Census dot map

Check out this great map made by Brandon Martin-Anderson.
There is one dot for every person in the US and Canada. Here is his website: http://bmander.com/dotmap/index.html


The ABCs of Architects

January 10, 2013

This is a fun diagram-like portrayal of a few of the famous architects and their projects. It’s short, sweet, and colorful.

Here’s the link if the video doesn’t play : http://vimeo.com/56974716


Common Ground and my architectural philosophy

October 15, 2012

Today, after a class discussion with David Leatherbarrow, I think I am closer to finding another piece of my personal philosophy on architecture.

Here I will try to articulate what I’ve learned. Know that I’m still in processing mode and thoughts will change, add, and grow on these issues. Many of these statements are quotes from David.

ARCHITECTURE NEEDS TO BE MORE GENEROUS. There I said it. It takes courage to give the heart of the ground floor, the heart of the building, over to the  public. (Leatherbarrow)

In Architecture we want to articulate our individuality, rather than what we share. Is there any common ground? Leatherbarrow argues that sites are not given, but constructed. The architecture project you create reveals the site.

Urban architecture, Leatherbarrow argues, should share space. He uses the word proportion, as in share the right amount. Just like at dinner. You may not eat as much as the person next to you, because you don’t have to. Good design always involves a donation of space to the public. It’s a sacrifice that makes the city better.

He gives three examples of this “sacrificing space.”

Palladio’s Palazzo Cheiricati 

ABI Building in Brazil

Tod Williams Billie Tsien’s  Skirkanich Hall

Part of sacrificing space is thickening the edge. The limit of your project should not be a line but a space.

It is this act of gift-giving of space that develops the common ground.

In contrast, Thom Mayne’s recent Cooper Union Building does not engage the public realm. It does not sacrifice for the benefit of the city. If you clicked on the link with the building, I would have to say I do not agree with the critics remarks about engaging the public. It does not. No where to sit. Barely an overhang to be sheltered from the rain or sun.

- – - – - -

About  city and society.

Richard Sennett’s The Fall of Public Man is an account of the modern attitude of our cities and space and how we interact with each other. I have not read it yet. Leatherbarrow warns us that it is pretty depressing, but we still need to read it. One way to look at cities is to see that all they are is circulation and police. We feel most comfortable at home. We have internalized the city. The car is the extension of the living room. Today, public does not equal shared, but unlimited access, accessibility.

- – - – - -

Is place a gradient then? If you set up the extremes:

Flow <- – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – -> Place

(circulation, continuous space)        (identity, regionalism, stability)

Many define the gradient as a blurred boundary. Leatherbarrow says it is not blurred. It is nuanced, exact, precise. There are structured, carefully constructed relationships that define space.

- – - – - – -

To be continued…and revised. I just like that architecture needs to be more giving. More in relation to its surroundings to give itself a stronger identity, and to be a good neighbor.


PlanCharlotte Additions

October 15, 2012

I need to write a ‘shout-out’ to our budding PlanCharlotte site! The site covers issues shaping growth in the Charlotte region.

I’ve had a part in the following articles:

May 25: Charlotte’s Great Walls. Here I examine some particularly blank and centralized walls and imagine things to do with them.

July 6: It’s Hip to be (a Water) Square. This article articulates a few of the things I learned on my Traveling Fellowship and ties our flooding condition to Charlotte. This will also roll into my thesis topic and these questions will consume my life for the next few months!

July 31: Eastland Mall, What’s Next? Some Options. Charlotte has a dead mall on it’s hands and here our research presents other now-living mall ideas.

September 11: Parking for Cars or PARK(ing) for People? I led Charlotte’s first (official- street level) PARK(ing) Day. (The first was in a parking lot in 2008 by Deb Ryan and her students.) I held it in SouthEnd and major organizing took place over just 2 weeks! It all came together wonderfully with borrowed materials!

October 3: Hitting the Streets, with Parks. This is my follow up article of the very successful event!

 


Up, Up, and Away!

May 16, 2012

Tomorrow I embark on a month long journey through Europe studying how cities and architecture there have given more space to water. I won a traveling fellowship through the School of Architecture and AIA Charlotte to fund my studies, which I’ll extend into my thesis year in the Master of architecture and urban design programs.

A few goals for the trip: I would like to talk to different planners, architects, engineers, designers, about how they are preparing for future changes in climate – like more flooding and storms. I want to learn more about how water is managed in cities – for example – how it is seen as a benefit, rather than a burden. I’m curious in the Rotterdam Climate Initiative and how they are building more space for water. This includes above ground storm water management (canals, etc). I’m also curious how architects are responding to the increasing possibility that water will be covering the area more frequently – are they designing floating structures? Or building up the land? Or other innovative solutions? Are there ecological solutions, like conserving the marshland and wetlands (these have absorbing powers) that planners are using in their cities?
So, I am interested in how these designs happen in architecture and also at a bigger scale in cities and future developments. I also dont know much about polders, so I want to learn about those! I’m really looking for forward thinkers who are being proactive about the future instead of reactive!
Here’s a general map of my travels (but subtract London and add Berlin)

Map of the travel stops

This is an example of the kinds of solutions I’m looking for – an idea that is multi beneficial across many needs: people, ecological, flooding protection, for example. Here’s a rendering I did of a Richard Serra sculpture in the Delaware River along Philadelphia’s coast that acts at once as a sea wall, public art, and ecological habitat.

Richard Serra public art seawall idea rendering

Richard Serra public art/seawall/habitat idea for Philadelphia I designed.


Pallet Place Farm?

April 24, 2012

Pallet fence idea for the Charlotte Urban Farm Project

When I walked out of my “home” at the UNCC Center City Building to check out what Lindsey and Allen were doing at their new farm site on the corner of 8th Street and Brevard I was immediately put to work (and seriously, how could I expect anything different?) I was tasked with designing a pallet fence. This week also happens to be FINALS week, so there is lots going on. But, because I’m a productive multi-tasking procrastinator I find useful things to do instead of the things I really should be doing, and this little project fits the bill! It was also a challenge to do a quick charrette and see how fast I could render something. With the help of fellow Urban Design student, Adam Martin, we came up with this easy-to-construct design. We’ll be doing some actual testing in the next few weeks to get the site secured.

Check out the Charlotte Urban Farm Project’s website! http://www.clturbanfarm.org/

I also thought it would be a good idea to do some vertical gardening projects in uptown on some of the blank walls, so I’m in the process of finding the right people to talk to to make that happen. Here are some of my ideas: http://cargocollective.com/the_spacebetween/Green-on-gray


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 27 other followers